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March 18, 2016 2 Comments

Looking for a solid 2-channel amplifier for under five-hundred bucks? Cool, we got one. The Cambridge Audio AM10 Integrated Amplifier with built-in phono pre is a solid little performer, perfectly suited to turntables like Project’s Debut Carbon or Rega’s RP1, respectively. It’s a humble 35 watt per channel beast, and when coupled with a pair of detailed bookshelves – some Cambridge Minx XL’s or SLA 25’s – the AM10 will capably extend throughout any small to mid-sized room. 

It’s a member of the Cambridge Topaz Series, a select range of amplifiers designed to give you uncompromising sound quality at an affordable price, and is packed with a ton of inputs like tuner, phono, CD, DVD, and Aux. However, in addition to all this it includes a very handy front-facing Mp3 3.5mm jack. With the proliferation of streaming services on smartphones and similar digital devices, it’s reassuring to know that an amplifier with a dedicated in-built phono pre, a feature unquestionably geared toward the resurgent vinyl market, is keeping in mind that the new breed of vinyl enthusiasts don’t mind streaming their music too. 

The AM10 is, for lack of a better term, the go-to “entry level” amplifier, designed to go easy on your wallet but give you a real taste of serious 2-channel sound. However, "entry level" is always such a questionable term when discussing audio, because it’s often synonymous with cheap – and it shouldn’t be. Cheap is something that gets you in the game, entry level is something else entirely. Entry level doesn’t just get you in the game, it gives you a taste of what real audio can actually do, the way music can and should sound if you only invest. Entry level offers the kind of sound staging cheap could only hope to possess, build quality that lasts, and a place from which to grow. 

Cambridge’s AM10 Integrated Amplifier offers all of the above, and with toroidal transformers, an all metal case, six separate inputs, and 35 watts of grunt per channel it’s audio equipment that returns big on your small investment. 

cambridge audio am10





2 Responses

Riz
Riz

November 09, 2016

Hi Marcia,
Apologies for the slow reply, did not see your comment pop up!
Yes you do get a far better sound when using an integrated amp with passive speakers. I would only recommend using powered speakers if you were space constricted, or were just after a simple setup with the least amount of gadgets possible.
The Cambridge Audio SX50 bookshelf’s pair up beautifully with the AM10 and Debut Carbon. If you have a look at our packaged deals there are a couple of different options there with the speakers/amp/turntable, if there are a few items your after that arn’t listed on that page please drop us a line and we are always happy to work out a good deal for you.
Hope that helps!

Riz
Vinyl Revival

Marcia
Marcia

October 31, 2016

Which speakers would you pair with the Cambridge Audio AM10+Carbon Debut? And do you feel that a separate amp/passive speakers is better over a quality phono amp/powered speakers? I appreciate your time!

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